Copenhagen Consensus Center
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Peter F. Orazem

Research areas
Labor economics, transition economies, human capital investment, rural labor markets, policy evaluation, applied econometrics

 

Publications

Assessment Paper

Third Copenhagen Consensus: Education Assessment, Ozarem

By Peter F. Orazem. Over the past 50 years, remarkable progress has been made ensuring that children receive basic education. More than sixty percent of adults in low-income countries can read and write, whereas in 1962, just one-third were literate.

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Assessment Paper

Second Copenhagen Consensus: Education Assessment, Orazem Glewwe Patrinos

By Peter F. Orazem, Paul Glewwe, and Harry Patrinos. Building human capital by developing literate populations is a key driver for further economic growth. Interventions to encourage the 14.4 million children who drop out of primary education to complete grade 5 would cost $3.6 billion and be highly cost effective.

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Assessment Paper

Bill Gates for a Day: Education

This paper reviews the stylized facts regarding the distribution of human capital investments and the returns to those investments in developing countries.

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Presentation

Bill Gates for a Day: Education presentation

Peter Orazem presented his findings on the topic of lack of education at the Bill Gates for a Day conference in March 2007.

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Perspective Paper

Post-2015 Consensus: Education Perspective, Orazem

52% of all primary-aged children who are not attending school are in Sub-Saharan Africa. Moreover, 61% of the children expected to receive no primary schooling during their lifetimes reside in that region. If we are to meet the Millennium Development Goal of Universal Primary Education for all, the countries of Sub-Saharan Africa represent the greatest challenge.

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Best Practice Paper

Second Copenhagen Consensus: Lowering the Price of Schooling Best Practice, Orazem et al

By Peter F. Orazem, Paul Glewwe and Harry Patrinos. In almost all countries of the world, schooling raises earnings. This is true in developing as well as developed countries. Similar returns to schooling are found for both urban and rural residents and for both women and men. The median increase in earnings varies from 8‐10% per added year of schooling.

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