Copenhagen Consensus Center
Home Menu

Projects

On this page you can find links to our current and past projects. 

India Consensus

The India Consensus is a partnership between the Copenhagen Consensus Center and the Tata Trusts . The aim is to identify the smartest solutions to some of India's most pressing development...

Read more

Andhra Pradesh Priorities

As a new state, Andhra Pradesh faces a bright future, but it is still experiencing many acute social and economic development challenges. It has made great strides in creating a positive environment...

Read more

Rajasthan Priorities

Rajasthan is the largest Indian state. It has a diversified economy, with mining, agriculture and tourism. Rajasthan has shown significant progress in improving governance and tackling corruption...

Read more

Haïti Priorise

Haiti faces some of the most acute social and economic development challenges in the world. Despite an influx of aid in the aftermath of the 2010 earthquake, growth and progress continue to be minimal, at best. With so many actors and the wide breadth of challenges, what should the top priorities be for policy makers, international donors, NGOs and businesses?

Read more

Bangladesh Priorities

What should be the top priorities for policy makers, international donors, NGOs and businesses? With limited resources and time, it is crucial that focus is informed by what will do the most good for each taka spent. The Bangladesh Priorities project works with stakeholders across Bangladesh to find, analyze, rank and disseminate the best solutions for the country.

Read more

Post-2015 Consensus

In 2015, the UN's Millennium Development Goals are expiring and the international community will set new goals. The Post-2015 Consensus brings together the world’s top economists, NGOs, international agencies and businesses to identify the goals with the greatest benefit-to-cost ratio for the next development agenda.

Read more

A Scorecard for Humanity

A Scorecard for Humanity fits into the ongoing conversation between optimists and pessimists for the last half century. The central question has been: what is the state of the world? The results of our study have been published by Cambridge University Press under the book title How Much Have Global Problems Cost the World? A Scorecard from 1900 to 2050

Read more

Copenhagen Consensus III

In 2004 and 2008, the Copenhagen Consensus Center held two major projects that helped to shape overseas development spending and philanthropic decisions for years to come. The third Copenhagen Consensus was the latest iteration of our ongoing work to prioritize the best solutions.

Read more

Rethink HIV

The Rethink HIV project is a joint venture between the Rush Foundation and the Copenhagen Consensus Center. Rush asked the Copenhagen Consensus Center to commission a group of leading health academics to analyze policy choices and to identify the most effective ways to tackle the pandemic across sub-Saharan Africa. RethinkHIV identifies effective interventions in the fight against HIV/AIDS.

Read more

Guide to Giving

Even the wealthiest government, business, or individual has limited resources. A dollar spent in one place cannot be spent elsewhere. We are often asked by individuals: how can I make personal donations in line with Copenhagen Consensus findings? This Guide provides an answer.

Read more

Copenhagen Consensus on Climate

Global warming is real; it is caused by man-made CO2 emissions, and we need to do something about it. But we don't need action that makes us feel good. We need action that actually does good.

Read more

Denmark Consensus 2009

What are Denmark's biggest challenges? What areas concern Danes the most, and where do they want Danish politicians to focus first? What are the best solutions to their concerns, and where can we do the most good?

Read more

Copenhagen Consensus II

The second Copenhagen Consensus took place 25-30 May in Copenhagen. Once again, our Expert Panel tackled the question, Imagine you had $75 billion to donate to worthwhile causes. What would you do, and where should we start? The Panel released a prioritized list recommending how best to tackle ten of the world's most pressing issues.

Read more

Copenhagen Consensus for Latin America

Copenhagen Consensus for Latin America and the Carribean took place in San José, Costa Rica, 22-25 October 2007 at the INCAE Business School, Alajuela, in cooperation with the Inter-American Development Bank

Read more

Bill Gates for a Day

If you were the richest man of the world how would you solve the world's problem? Participate in the event and give your prioritization....

Read more

Copenhagen Consensus UNICEF

The Copenhagen Consensus UNICEF meeting brought together a number of UN ambassadors and set focus on the issue of prioritizing the use of limited resources in the global effort to mitigate the negative consequences of ten global challenges such as HIV/AIDS, malaria, hunger and climate change.

Read more

Copenhagen Consensus Georgetown

Copenhagen Consensus 2006 followed a similar procedure to the first Copenhagen Consensus, drawing on the earlier exercise. Representatives had available to them the materials from the previous meeting, and over two days heard new presentations from acknowledged economists and UN experts for each of the ten challenge areas.

Read more

Copenhagen Consensus

The Copenhagen Consensus was our first project. The basic idea was to improve prioritization of the numerous problems the world faces, by gathering some of the world's greatest economists to a meeting where some of the biggest challenges in the world would be assessed.

Read more

Australia Consensus Centre

Policy and prioritization research institute, sister organisation of Copenhagen Consensus.

Read more